Month: February 2012

You’ve Been Placed. And You’ve Been Spotted


Product placement has become to video what social media is to media.  It is intrinsic to its fabric.  It has become second nature.  It has become indiscernible.  And that is why I continue to enjoy observing and calling out the placements I spot.  Here is my third installment.  (Stay tuned for more.)

  • Colbert and Wheat Thins: Colbert coins the term “Sponsortunity” on an episode in which he reads at length from the branding memo for “Wheat Thins” that only someone in brand management could have written.  A real treat and must-see for those in marketing.
  • Diet Coke: Diet Coke seems to have used product placement in its own ad (“Not All Stars Appear On Screen”) during the Oscars.  The commercial shows the evolution of a film from script to production with cameo appearances by Diet Coke cans, e.g., in the hands of the writers and those producing the film and placed on the shelves of the door to the sound stage.

  • Apple: I find it so interesting to see which programs use Apple computers but cover up the otherwise highly visible Apple on the back of each device.  Example: Two and a Half Men.  Clearly, the producers like the aesthetic and how it fits with Ashton’s character, but, I guess they did not strike a deal with Apple, so they cover up the fruit.  Other shows go all the way – do they get paid for that?  In Showtime’s “House of Lies,” the consultants use Lenovo Think Pads.  I would expect no less (and it makes me cringe a little when I think back to my pre-Mac years).

For more examples, check out: Place the Spot, Spot the Placement and Spot the Placement, Place the Spot.

Playing with Pinterest, Tallying with Twitter


I finally spent an evening (ok late night) playing with Pinterest, and I can see why it’s so addictive. So many beautiful images. It’s visual decadence and indulgence.

It’s uplifting. A great way to spend half an hour… or more. It’s also extremely easy to use with an overall positive vibe (or tone, as Pinterest would say). People are sharing things they find uplifting or attractive or thought provoking, in a light hearted way. As of now, no disturbing images. And wonderful production quality. I wonder how they control for that. Images come from the Internet, so they’re not really user generated – though they are user curated. That maintains this highly polished experience.

But what’s especially nice – it’s all about the details – is the email you get when you sign up: “Hi karenlevine,” it says, “YOU are the newest member of Pinterest, a community to share collections of things you love. We’re excited to have you as a member and can’t wait to see what you pin.” Now that’s just nice.

Twitter, of course, is also addictive, but in a different way. On Twitter, I find myself almost unhealthily aware of how many followers I have. Am I loved??? Am I respected?  It’s like they days when you would come home and rush to see whether you had voicemails.

Every time I post something on Twitter, I watch to see if it leads to more followers – in that vast community of hundreds of millions of people I don’t know. Someone out there shares a topic I am interested in and felt that what I had to say merited following me.

Of course, I also look to see whether I have been retweeted, the ultimate compliment. Or retweeted my multiple people, a real head rush.  And then there are the responses. The exchanges you have with someone you don’t know at all. At social media week, it was truly fun to watch people who had somehow ended up following or corresponding with each other meet in person. And because the avatars are typically photos, it makes it that much easier.

Social Media, Reese Witherspoon and Pinterest


Last night on Chelsea Lately, Reese Witherspoon admitted that she “doesn’t get” social media.  Twitter, she said, “scares me.”  And, although she knew she had a Facebook page, she thought, upon Chelsea’s suggestion, that the address is likely www.reesewitherspoon.com.  (It isn’t.)

This adds credence to Terri Li’s estimation during a Social Media Week panel entitled “The New Ghostwriter” that 4/5 of celebrity twitter feeds are ghostwritten.  Terri is the Chief Operating Officer of Bre.ad.  It’s no surprise, of course, that Reese does not manage her own Facebook page.  However… the point of this comment, and the part that is (ironically) interesting is that Reese exclaimed in the next sentence that she LOVES pinterest.

On another Social Media Week panel, Jon Steinberg, the president of buzzfeed said of pinterest: “I think it’s going to be one of the most powerful business models after Google.”  Wow, that’s big.  What happened to the days when social media and other sites took years to figure out how to monetize themselves?  In fact, Google itself took 5 years before hitting the lottery.

Images below: reesewitherspoon.com (top) and Reese’s Facebook page (bottom)

Pinterest: The Newest Face of Social Media


This is the newest face of social media.  It’s the site that no one knew much about a few months ago and everyone is talking about at Social Media Week today (February 2012).  Pinterest is a virtual pinboard that lets you organize and share all the beautiful things you find in your life.

(It’s a good thing they started with the word pin board rather than cork board or bulletin board… When I was a teenager, I badly wanted my parents to turn one of the walls of my bedroom into a bulletin board!  When I got to college, I learned about the magical powers of tape.)

The key element of pinterest is the focus on images.  Like Instagram, it showcases one of the most important aspects of social media today – sharing photos and other images.  It seems to me that Facebook has become not only Flickr but those emails you used to get with humorous graphics.  It makes the site a fun place to stop off before bed.


 

Geolocation: What Art Though to Me? Part VI


Each day, geolocation has a unique impact on my life as I watch the way it influences my city, myself, and increasingly, my world. A few months after joining foursquare in 2010, I decided to keep a journal of my new life with geolocation.

You have now entered Part VI this ongoing tale – tracking the personal, sociological and historic milestones associated with the rapidly growing service/game/application. Click on the Geolocation tab for the full story or check my archives for Parts III,  IIIIV and V.

 

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Eureka!  I’ve rediscovered specials and – in a way – trending on FourSquare.  And, in the process, I happened upon a tie in with Groupon.  It’s all so incestuous, these frenemies.  In the images below, please note: (a) “Special” next to my local designer pizza joint Freddie and Pepper’s  – tied in with Groupon (b) little person image next to the Beacon that shows that 12 people have checked in (c) This is new to me – “Show” icon next to the Beacon.  I’ll have to investigate that further.  Something GetGlue-ish???

Just arrived home from a phenomenal meal at a restaurant in Chelsea called Westville – an amazing meal thanks to all the people who left me tips on foursquare, from the scores of them who recommended the four market sides for $14 to a non anonymous stranger named Frank, who recommended the chocolate pecan pie.  My friend Nancy and I thank you all.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

It seems that my taste in primetime television is on par with other GetGlue users – and that the app (which is not actually geolocation but was initially positioned as the foursquare for people who stay home..) is gaining serious traction.  I checked into “New Girl” along with 7,173 other viewers and joined 14,682 other Glee fans when I checked into that show.  I watched both via DVR.  Keep you eye on this one.

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Have you checked out Square’s Card Case app. You should. If only to experience the art of what’s possible. You can pay for things by simply giving your name to the retailer.

Ok, so I’m working my way through Mary Meeker’s 2011 Internet trends and discovering all kinds of treats and terms along the way.  Many of which are mobile, and many of which are location based.  (I’ve even adopted a new phrase: “Geosocial networking.”  Nice.)  Here’s one I find intriguing: Shopkick. And here’s what they have to say about themselves:
“shopkick gives you awesome deals and rewards simply for walking into your favorite stores. You can collect your kicks™ rewards at millions of stores in America, and great deals at many of the top national retailers.

Collect walk-in rewards: Have you ever gotten rewarded simply for walking into stores – yes, just for visiting? Now you can collect boatloads of kicks™ in the kicks Reward Program and unlock awesome exclusive deals at your favorite stores. Just walk into 1,300 Best Buy stores in all 50 states, and hundreds of Target stores, Macy’s, American Eagle, Sports Authority, Crate&Barrel, West Elm, Wet Seal and the largest Simon malls! Open the shopkick app on your iPhone or Android phone in the entrance area, and wait for a few seconds. Your shopkick app will reward you instantly.  shopkick is adding more stores in more cities every month.

Get exclusive deals: Discover and unlock awesome deals in the shopkick app at dozens of national stores, many of them are exclusively offered to shopkick users only.

Collect scan rewards: Collect additional kicks rewards by scanning barcodes of featured products with your phone at 250,000 stores across the United States.

Redeem your kicks™ for rewards! Get rewards like iTunes gift cards, restaurant vouchers, Best Buy/Target/Macy’s/American Eagle/Sports Authority instant gift cards, Facebook Credits, movie tickets, or if you go all out, a 3D 55″ Sony Bravia HDTV or a cruise around the world! And if you want to change the world, donate your kicks to 30 different causes!”

Friday, November 18, 2011

The next (current) phase in location based services is Near Field Communication (NFC).  (I call it a LBS because the two devices need to be near each other.) Here’s how wikipedia defines NFC:

NEAR FIELD COMMUNICATION, or NFC, allows for simplified transactions, data exchange, and wireless connections between two devices in proximity to each other, usually by no more than a few centimeters.  It is expected to become a widely used system for making payments by smartphone in the United States. [Gosh, it seems like decades ago that I read about Japan doing this.  Oh right, it was.  It was commonplace as long ago as early 2006 when I did my first mobile study for BusinessWeek.] Many smartphones currently on the market already contain embedded NFC chips that can send encrypted data a short distance (“near field”) to a reader located, for instance, next to a retail cash register. Shoppers who have their credit card information stored in their NFC smartphones can pay for purchases by waving their smartphones near or tapping them on the reader, rather than using the actual credit card. Co-invented by NXP Semiconductors and Sony in 2002, NFC technology is being added to a growing number of mobile handsets to enable mobile payments, as well as many other applications.

And, here are some of the applications (by applications, I mean uses) – again, from wikipedia:

(1) Social Networking

NFC simplifies and expands social networking options:

  • File Sharing: Tap one NFC device to another to instantly share a contact, photo, song, application, video, or website link.
  • Electronic business card: Tap one NFC device to another to instantly share electronic business cards or resumes.
  • Electronic money: To pay a friend, you could tap the devices and enter the amount of the payment.
  • Mobile gaming: Tap one NFC device to another to enter a multiplayer game.
  • Friend-to-friend: You could touch NFC devices together to Facebook friend each other or share a resume or to “check-in” at a location.

(2) Bluetooth and WiFi Connections

NFC can be used to initiate higher speed wireless connections for expanded content sharing.

  • Bluetooth: Instant Bluetooth Pairing can save searching, waiting, and entering codes. Touch the NFC devices together for instant pairing.
  • WiFi: Instant WiFi Configuration can configure a device to a WiFi network automatically. Tap an NFC device to an NFC enabled router.

(3) eCommerce

NFC expands eCommerce opportunities, increases transaction speed and accuracy, while reducing staffing requirements. A Personal identification number (PIN) is usually only required for payments over $100 (in Australia) and £15 (in UK).

  • Mobile payment: An NFC device may make a payment like a credit card by touching a payment terminal at checkout or a vending machine when a PIN is entered.
  • PayPal: PayPal may start a commercial NFC service in the second half of 2011.[15][16]
  • Google Wallet is an Android app that stores virtual versions of your credit cards for use at checkout when a PIN is used.
  • Ticketing: Tap an NFC device to purchase railmetroairline, movie, concert, or event tickets. A PIN is required.
  • Boarding pass: A NFC device may act as a boarding pass, reducing check-in delays and staffing requirementsFr.
  • Point of Sale: Tap an SmartPoster tag to see information, listen to an audio clip, watch a video, or see a movie trailer.
  • Coupons: Tapping an NFC tag on a retail display or SmartPoster may give the user a coupon for the product.
  • Tour guide: Tap a passive NFC tag for information or an audio or video presentation at a museum, monument, or retail display (much like a QR Code).

(4) Identity documents

NFC’s short range helps keep encrypted identity documents private.

  • ID card: An NFC enabled device can also act as an encrypted student, employee, or personal ID card or medical ID card.
  • Keycard: An NFC enabled device may serve as car, house, and office keys.
  • Rental Car and hotel keys: NFC rental car or hotel room keys may allow fast VIP check-in and reduce staffing requirements.

The future (or past…) is here.
Sunday, December 4th, 2011

I’ve checked into the Central Park Tennis Center 88 times and into my apartment building 726 times.

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

On Monday of this week, Gowalla was acquired by Facebook.  That’s huge.  What impact will this have on foursquare?

Friday, January 13, 2012

The American Express tie-in with Foursquare has been simplified and is quite nice.  When you check into a participating location, you are notified of an AMEX special.  If you use your AMEX card there, you get a $10 credit on your statement.  Nice.  I’ve used it at a restaurant and a nail salon.  It’s a good promotion because it encourages you to use your AMEX card to pay – at the time and point of purchase.  Moreover, it gives you an incentive to spend at least $10, a requirement I met easily with my yummy chicken parmesan and lovely pedicure.  What will be especially valuable is to use it for an $11 manicure…

If you’d like to read more of my thoughts on geolocation, click on the Geolocation tab or check out Part V of this series.

Social Media Tidbits I


Visit me here for social media tidbits I find worthy of sharing.  Share with me your thoughts.

Do You “Like” Me?  Do You Really “Like” Me?

Much of both Advertising Week and OMMA Global was spent talking about the importance of being “Liked,” as in the Facebook “Like” functionality.  The conclusion was that (a) consumers don’t hate advertising, they hate bad advertising… (b) if you keep it under control, it can be powerful (c) consumers DO want to have relationships with brands they care about – as well as those who offer them something for being their “friend.”  So, ironically, today’s eMarketer article includes two charts about consumers attitudes towards letting brands/advertisers/companies into their Facebook worlds:

Discretion

We’ll move now to a personal admonition – things individuals should consider before posting on their social networking site (69% of prospective employers have rejected a candidate based on something posted on a social networking site).  Below, we get into what organizations should do at a minimum in social media – to avoid regrets.

The chart below shows the huge draw Facebook has on our time.  Far and away higher than any other U.S. Web Brands in terms of total minutes.  I was intrigued by the Facebook phenomenon back when I joined in early 2006  (as one of 7.5 MM unique users) – and suggested my media client take a serious look at it.  At the time, Facebook was just opening up beyond college students.  Here are some bullet points I put in my report in February 2006:

Overview:

  • Social network site for college & university students
  • Founded by Mark Zuckerberg; raised $500,000 from Peter Thiel in angel round
  • Raised $12.2MM from Accel partners in April 2005 (valuation of $100MM)
  • Began allowing high school students to join September 2, 2005: High school and college networks are kept separate.  There are 20K U.S. high schools.
Membership (info as of September 2005)
  • Must have .edu email address to join
  • Supports 1,120 colleges – 56% (Source: Scott Osman, 2/10/06 – up from 880)
  • 85% of students in supported colleges have a profile
  • 7.5MM unique users in January
  • 60% of members log in daily; 85% at least weekly; 93% at least monthly
  • Recent alums are maintaining same log in rates
  • Users can add favorite music, books, movies, quotes, etc. and see others who share same interests; can also form and/or join groups
  • Additional functionality: events, messages
Who knew!

Here’s an interesting post from ClickZ by Heidi Cohen:

What’s Your Social Media Marketing IQ?

As you make your 2012 marketing plans, consider what you need to do to take your social media marketing to the next level. To ensure your firm’s maximizing its social media effectiveness, now’s the time to check your organization’s social media marketing IQ.

Here are 30 questions to help determine your firm’s social media marketing IQ. These questions will help you assess where your organization is in terms of social media marketing maturity and where you may need to improve effectiveness. Depending on where your organization is along the social media adoptioncurve, some of these questions can help you develop plans going forward.

Listening

  1. Do you have brand monitoring and/or other analytics in place? If you don’t have the budget for professional social media monitoring, use free options such as Google Alerts, Twitter Search, and Google Analytics.
  2. Are you analyzing the information collected?
  3. Are you taking action where appropriate based on your brand monitoring? Remember, about 2 percent of the comments require any company interaction.

Social Media Guidelines

  1. Do you have social media guidelines for how employees should represent themselves and what they can say?
  2. Do you have guidelines for what’s acceptable for customers and the public to contribute on your organization’s website, blog, and/or forum? This doesn’t mean you can delete negative comments! Customers will say whatever they want on their own and third-party social media networks where you have no control.
  3. Do you have a crisis management plan? If so, do you review it regularly to ensure it’s up to date and employees know what to do? If not, here’s help to develop one.

Goals

  1. Do you have goals for your social media marketing? This is a critical first step of any marketing strategy. Don’t think it’s just a test and we’ll figure it out later. If it works, you’ll need to make a case for more resources.
  2. Are your social media marketing goals related to your overall business objectives? This is a must for any marketing plans!
  3. Is your social media marketing driving revenues? For many businesses, this is a sign of social media maturity.

Management

  1. Does senior management buy into social media as part of your marketing and business plans? Recognize this can be difficult to achieve. Research shows leadership at one in three businesses supports social media marketing after three years.
  2. If management doesn’t buy into social media marketing, are you bringing them up to speed? Chances are that you need to show how it drives results associated with business goals.
  3. Are you expanding buy-in beyond senior management? Think customer service, sales, product management, human resources, investor relations, and other organizational departments.

Social Media Marketing Strategies

  1. Do you have a social media marketing strategy? What do you want to accomplish?
  2. Are your social media marketing strategies integrated with your overall marketing plans?
  3. Are employees monitoring social media marketing implementation(s)? Customers will use every point of contact to reach a human being.
  4. Are you promoting your social media marketing efforts? To drive customers and the public to your social media marketing, you must continually promote it. Use internal media.
  5. Do you make it easy for social media participants to share your content? Think social sharing including Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, and Twitter.
  6. Do you have tailored call-to-action and tracking mechanisms integrated into your social media marketing efforts?Prospects and customers need to be guided through your sales process.

Social Media Marketing Content

  1. Are you creating tailored content for your social media marketing initiatives? Since social media thrives on content, ensure your social media efforts have the fuel they need.
  2. Have you created a variety of content formats?
  3. Does your content support every stage of the purchase process? The information consumers need may cut across your organization. To support these efforts, use an editorial calendar and marketing personas.
  4. Is your social media-related content integrated into your search optimization efforts?

Social Media Marketing Budget

  1. Do you have a dedicated social media marketing budget? Social media marketing isn’t free! You can’t count on having a robust social media marketing strategy without financial and headcount resources. If you don’t have a dedicated budget, can you leverage other resources or hide your social media marketing budget?
  2. Do you have headcount dedicated to your social media marketing efforts? If not, are social media marketing activities incorporated into specific employees’ job descriptions? If no one’s required to do the work, it won’t happen.
  3. Do you have social media training to ensure employees understand how to engage on social media platforms and are consistent in how they represent your organization? Many firms overlook this important factor.
  4. Do you have a social media contingency plan to ensure you have personnel involved and monitoring social media 24/7?What happens if your social media manager’s sick or unavailable and there’s a problem?

Metrics

  1. Do you have established metrics to track social media marketing efforts back to marketing and/or business objectives?This is best done when you’re planning your strategy.
  2. Do your metrics include the full purchase process not just the last marketing touched? Social media can influence customers before you realize they’re shopping and after they’ve bought your product or service.
  3. Do your social media metrics go beyond marketing? Think broadly across your business such as customer service.
  4. Are you measuring the ROI of your social media marketing? Understand it takes time to have a well-integrated social media marketing strategy where you can measure your investment and results accurately. Short-term, determine whether your social media marketing contributes to achieving your business goals.

Social media marketing is a growing part of every marketer’s plans and budget. Regardless of where you are on the social media marketing continuum, you must assess the effectiveness of what you’re currently doing and implement strategies to enhance your results.

Twittered Me This Then – My First Exposure to Twitter


On the eve of Social Media Week 2012, I thought I would share with you my first exposure to Twitter, back in April 2008.  Who knew that a few years later I would have 575 people following my tweets and be named a top outreacher by Social@Ogilvy.

Twitter Me This

Twitter Me This! That is going to be the headline for my next blog, as soon as I fully determine my point of view about Twitter. After all, I am a new media guru, so I should be fully immersed in, engaged by and adoptive of “Twitter.” It’s been around for about a year, but it’s the hot new thing. I’ve already started including it in brainstorms for my clients… (wish I could tell you…)

I actually found out about Twitter (and subsequently, Snitter) when I spoke on a panel about Careers in New Media at Columbia University, and the organizer of the event asked the students not to Twitter during the talk. Evidently Second Life and virtual worlds are yesterday’s news, replaced by… Twitter. (I do like the name.) Of course, as soon as I had heard about Twitter via the student population, I began to hear about it everywhere.

(Side note: People in new media and in marketing should procreate — or teach — just to stay on top of consumer trends.)

Within days, I heard the term mentioned multiple times by the folks at one of my most cutting edge clients: Campfire. And then in the halls of another client — the digital media division of one of the advertising networks. And I’d only just discerned the difference between a widget and a gadget! I promptly went on to Twitter and signed up to track my Campfire client and some of the Twitterers he recommended. Twitter asked me what I was doing at that moment, and I told it — it wasn’t very interesting.

So… now what? I tracked the conversation of one of the recommended writers, who was flying on Virgin America and reporting that the (very cool) in seat entertainment center now offered blog content. Well, that is kind of cool, but not necessarily the best use of my time in keeping up with important news. (Sidebar: I will someday write about the in-seat on-demand offerings on Virgin America, which are very blog-worthy.)”

The Australian Open – Two Weeks with Rafa, Roger, Novak, Layton and Jelena


As Eli Manning declares his plans to visit Disneyland, and New Yorkers bask in the afterglow of our ticker tape parade, I am still recovering from two intense weeks that were the Australian Open.  (That’s tennis for those less obsessed than I.)

Thanks to ESPN2 and my Time Warner Cable DVR, I awoke every morning for two weeks to a Christmas morning of sorts, full of 10 some hours of tennis coverage.  Putting aside the incredible athleticism, the fit and attractive main characters and the fashion considerations, just the fact that I had a window into beautiful summer weather made the tournament an uplifting addiction.

But there was more to it than that.  When you spend so much time observing the drama that was those two weeks, it is only natural to have thoughts that beg to be shared.  Shared with someone.  Friends, yes, but also, my blog.  (In great part because I have not had a chance to write in a while, so this offers great inspiration.)

So, some observations.  We know that psychology is important to sports and that tennis, in particular, is as much a head game as a game of skill.  In fact, I had the opportunity to have dinner with Tracy Austin a few years ago at which time she acknowledged that a primary reason she won her first U.S. Open is that she was too young to know what a big deal it was.

So back to the observations.  Andre Agassiz observed that tennis is like life.  And like Russian dolls.  Points make up games.  Games make up sets.  Sets make up matches.  Matches make up tournaments – in the same way that seconds make up minutes, make up hours and so on.  And what I find so interesting is that as hard as you fight for a particular point or game or set, when it is over, you are back to square one.  A set won 6-0 is equivalent to a set won 7-6 in a grueling tiebreaker.  Hence, when a match is tied 1-1, it is completely equal.  Except for this.  The player who won the second set is pumped, even deliriously happy as when Nadal fell to his knees after winning the fourth set of the finals.  And the player who won the first set, who came out of the gate flying, is dejected, frustrated, even angry.  I noticed this especially when the young 21-year-old Canadian player Raonic was playing the “old” 30-year-old Layton Hewitt.  Going into the break between the second and third sets, Raonic looked distraught and Hewitt invigorated.  But, from a scoreboard point of view, they were equal.  That’s what they mean when they talk about “momentum.”

What else?  Well, if it is not already the case, then Novak Djokovic’s girlfriend (Jelena Ristic) needs to be approached by a clothing manufacturer or designer for product placement.  All the players have logos galore, but she, who seems to be on screen more than anyone other than the two players, is left to her own impeccable taste to decide how to dress.  (By the way, she’s gorgeous if you were not aware.)  This is a missed sponsorship opportunity.

And, how about those tennis fashions?  For some reason Adidas felt compelled to subject those they sponsor to a disturbing combination of peach and coral that even men on the courts in Central Park remembered two weeks later.  My nephew, who plays wheelchair tennis competitively, tells me it’s because the manufacturers want to show off bright colors at this first summer event.  But I found it cruel.  It took me a while, by the way, to understand why so many players were wearing the exact same dress or style.  At first I thought they might be from the same Eastern European nation.  Then I realized it was Adidas.  I imagine they feel that by having multiple players, who may not make it very far into the tournament, wear the same outfit, they get similar air time as they would if a highly seeded player wore it for many rounds.  That said, the fact that the women’s tennis has become a game of “your guess is as good as mine” makes it hard to predict who might actually have significant airtime.  Even Sharapova, who made it to the finals, went down in a quite brief 6-3 6-0 match.

But let’s get back to Nadal.  Nadal has become my inspiration.  Yes, he’s cute and cuddly and muscular and fit and a magnificent athlete… wait, where was I?  Ah, right, inspiration.  As one of the commentators observed, Nadal plays every point as if it is match point.  No matter how unlikely it seems that he might win – as with the, sigh, U.S. Open of last year, he will never lose hope.  He will never stop fighting.  If Nadal (oh, and Djokovic too) can play a 6 hour final match, then I can (in theory), run for 45 minutes on the treadmill, or hold that tortuous yoga pose until the instructor lets me (please, for G-d’s sake) move on.  So, somehow, even when Nadal loses.  (And, don’t get me wrong, I’m still in mourning for this year’s final), I feel somehow inspired.

To expand upon that point, I have friends who are not Nadal fans.  I don’t fully get it, but it’s true.  Many are Federer fans.  And I can appreciate that.  He’s a class act.  But it does make me wonder what makes someone a Nadal fan and others a Federer fan.  (Putting Novak aside for the moment.)  They are, after all, different.  Nadal is wearing bright swaths of color.  Lime green and sporty blue – on simple (high tech) t-shirts.  Federer’s shirts all have collars.  (Federer has Rolex as his sponsor.)  But I love Nadal.  He’s PASSIONATE.  And he’s physical in a warm way.  When Federer first lost to him and was crying, Nadal put his arm around Federer’s neck and his head on his shoulder.  (I could die!)  When Nadal passed Novak on the grounds of the Ossie open, he patted his back rather than just shaking his hand.  It’s these little things that appeal to me.

So, back to fashion.  What’s up with the mismatched yet coordinated wristbands.  One blue, one white.  One black, one red.  I don’t know.  I can’t think of the colors, but it’s a thing.  Someone ordained it.  They take the colors from the tennis outfit and break them out into two wristbands.  This meant, of course, that when Novak switched from his white shirt to his black shirt in the second or third set – also an interesting move – his blue wristband didn’t make sense, as it was not reflected in the shirt.

So….  what was supposed to be a quick post feels like it could go on and on – much like the 6 hour final, so I must end it somewhat arbitrarily and abruptly.  I hope you’ve enjoyed my tennis musings – brought to you thanks to the coverage of ESPN2 (and the Tennis Channel) and the DVR functionality of Time Warner Cable.

Mobile Facts Change So Fast – 2010


On at least three occasions, I have written posts that incorporated a summary of notable stats about mobile apps and the mobile space in general to set the scene for a topical discussion.  But the facts change so fast that I was continuously updating the posts, and the posts had a tendency to grow and grow at the rate of foursquare subscribers.  So, I’m breaking 2010 into its own post.  It’s not meant to relegate it to the past because it’s not only fascinating but important to see from whence we’ve come.  So feel free to compare these stats and info graphics to those in the 2011-2012 post.

Smartphone Penetration and Share Q3 2010

  • Twenty-eight percent of US mobile subscribers have smartphones as of Q3 2010, according to data from The Nielsen Company
  • 41% of recent mobile phone acquirers have smartphones
  • Among US smartphone owners, the Apple iPhone OS has practically caught up to the market-leading RIM Blackberry OS, with 28% and 30% marketshare
  • Google’s Android OS is now at 19% and growing.
  • The Android is less than 2 1/2 years old – AndroLib.com

Smartphone Penetration and Share 1st Part of 2010

  • Droid outsold Apple: In the first half of 2010, Google-powered Android phones outsold Apple’s iPhone in the U.S. (Nielsen)
  • Among consumers who purchased a smartphone in the first half of 2010, 27% opted for Android phones, compared with 23% who bought an iPhone. Android’s total market share of 13% still lags well behind both Apple (28%) and Research in Motion, maker of the BlackBerry (35%).
  • Look at Droid go!  Look at Droid grow!

App vs. WAP

  • The discussion of Apps vs. WAPs is heating up with the growth of the Android market and the number of Android champions – Motorola, Sony Ericsson, Google, etc.  The advantage of the mobile app is that it can tap into other mobile apps – and, for me, it’s just cleaner and faster to get to.  The advantage of the WAP (wireless application protocol) is that it can be richer and closer to the online experience.
  • Apple has revolutionized the mobile space by spurring the development of 200,000+ mobile apps for Apple platforms.  Google is calling the browser the “killer app” for mobile that will eradicate the need for developers to create different apps for each platform: Apple, Android, etc.  Personally, I don’t see the app marketplace going away any time soon.  The use of browser applications may increase as connectivity speed increases (says the poor woman with the AT&T service plan), but I would advise my clients to cover their bases with iPhone, iPad, Droid, and WAP versions – at the least.

Apple’s Spring Season (quarter ending June 26th, 2010)

  • Apple sold nearly 12 million iphones and ipads in the quarter ending June, 2010
  • 3.5 million Macs and 8.4 million iPhones were sold, with  iPhone sales increasing 61% versus year ago.
  • The Company began selling iPads during the quarter, with total sales of 3.3 million.
  • iPod sales declined 8% versus year ago, tapping out at 9.4 million units

Apple’s Summer Season (quarter ending September 25th, 2010)

Apple sold:

  • 3.89 million Macs (+ 27 % vs. YAGO)
  • 14.1 million iPhones (+ 91 %)
  • 9.05 million iPods (-11%) – looks like iPhones are cannibalizing iPods
  • 4.19 million iPads (that means 7.49 million since introduction last quarter)

RIM sold 12.1 million units in their last reported quarter – as a point of comparison

Apple achieved its highest revenue ever this quarter ($20.3 billion)

Apple Apps

  • As of September 1, 2010, there are at least 250,000 third-party applications officially available on the App Store, with over 6.5 billion total downloads (“Apple Special Event” via wikipedia)
  • As of June 22, 2010, there were more than 11,000 new applications created exclusively for the iPad (Apple)
  • This does not include “unauthorized” iPhone apps
  • There is a category of apps developed to help people discover… apps.  Notable examples include: AppMiner, BargainBin and StoreExtend for finding bargains and seeing what’s new; Apple’s own iPhone Apps Recommendations and Genius offerings; and Appsfire, Appsaurus, Appolicious, Apptizr and Chomp for recommendations and reviews.
  • iPhone customers who go to the App Store download almost twice as many programs as those who use Google Inc.’s Android Market or BlackBerry’s App World, according to a study from Nielsen Co. (via Bloomberg, September 13, 2010)

How Wired Are We – U.S.?

  • There were 291 million U.S. wireless subscribers as of June 2010
  • 93% of Americans have a mobile phone
  • The number of consumers accessing the mobile Internet in the United States has jumped from 54 million in May 2009 to 72 million in May 2010, a year-over-year increase of 33 percent (Nielsen)
  • Multipurpose smartphones that allow users to access the web and email as well as run thousands of apps and share text and picture messages reached 25% of the U.S. mobile market in June 2010, up from 23% in the prior quarter and 16% just one year ago (data from The Nielsen Company published on its blog Nielsenwire). By the end of 2011, Nielsen predicts smartphones to overtake feature phones in the U.S. market.

How Wired Are We – Globally?

  • There are approximately 5 billion mobile phones in the world; that’s more than two mobile phones for every three people on the planet.  (4.6 billion at the end of 2009; 4.7 billion according to U.N. in February; expected to reach 5 billion in 2010)
  • There are currently 636 million mobile subscribers in India, representing 65% of the population.  The subscription base is expected to reach full penetration by 2014, creating a market of 1.2 billion mobile subscribers. (Telecom Regulatory Authority of India – TRIA, Gartner, Informa Telecoms and Media – July and May 2010)

Ad Networks for Sale

  • In November 2009, Google purchased AdMob for $750 million
  • In January of 2010, Apple acquired Quattro Wireless for $275 million
  • After stating that Google and Apple overpaid for their acquisitions, RIM opted not to purchase Millenial Media for the ad network’s $400-500 MM asking price

The All Elusive Mobile Metrics and Analytics

  • Nokia acquired Motally, an analytics firm that provides companies with data that helps them profile their customers – August 20th, 2010

Mobile Advertising

  • US mobile ad spending is expected to increase nearly 80% in 2010 to reach $743 million. eMarketer estimates that mobile ad spend will exceed $1 billion in 2011 ($1.1 billion) (eMarketer, October 2010)
  • Brand recall rates from mobile marketing are 20 times greater than for the web and 10 times greater than for direct mail (HipCricket via Mobile 4 Franchises – October 26, 2010)

Mobile Health

  • 70% med students own iPhone/iTouch, + 39% vs. 2009. 24% plan to switch to Android –ePocrates, summer 2010
  • Stanford School of Medicine has given an iPad to every incoming student in the Class of 2014.
  • According to an interview with Manhattan Research’s Monique Levy posted on the blog sitePixels and Pills, nearly 75% of physicians have smart phones – 3 times the general population.
  • According to Manhattan Research, as reported on darkdaily.com, smartphone penetration among physicians is expected to reach to 82% by 2011, with more than half that number using the devices for such tasks as administrative work, continuing medical education, and patient care.
  • 20% of physicians plan to get an iPad within the first year of its introduction – Epocrates, February 2010
  • 20 million U.S. adults are accessing health information from cell phones, smart phones or PDAs – a number that has doubled in the last year (March 2010, mmm)

Android Apps

That actually took me quite by surprise.  I had heard and believed estimates that there would be 150,000 Android apps by the end of 2010 back, I believe, in late 2009 or at the start of the year.  But during Internet Week, I was hearing numbers closer to 40,000 (apps available at that time) and over a recent dinner with Sony Ericsson execs, the number I was hearing was 60,000.

But Sebastien Chalmeton tweeted this morning that Android had surpassed the 100K mark – on about the same day that foursquare passed the 2 million mark, by the way, so I am hereby sharing that up to date mobile stat.

However… on July 14th, I attended a talk by a Google mobile executive, and the number he was given by Google PR was, in fact, 65,000, which is more consistent with what I had been hearing  I will have to circle back with AndroLib to understand the discrepancy.  Quite a contrast with Apple’s App Store – single provider, single source of data.  Does Droid have that kind of walled garden approval structure?

  • A year ago, there were 10,000 Android apps – AndroLib.com, July 10, 2010